EXCEPT WHERE INDICATED, THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED ON THIS PAGE ARE NOT NECESSARILY THOSE OF THE MILWAUKEE COURIER

Capitol Report – The truth about Walker’s world

By State Representative, Leon D. Young

Leon D. Young

Leon D. Young

Just one week ago, on April 15 (Tax Day), Governor Scott Walker officially launched his re-election bid for a second term in office.

Flanked by his family and Lt. Governor Rebecca Kleefisch and her family, the governor was eager to talk about Wisconsin’s “rosy economy” under his administration.

Walker spent considerable time espousing the virtues of “hard work and pride” in lieu of “dependence on government.”

He also took particular pride in referencing the tax cuts he has put into place since assuming office.

However, what I found to be most interesting and telling was the sundry things that Walker intentionally omitted.

Walker didn’t mention his 2010 campaign promise to create 250,000 jobs during his first term.

Moreover, there was no mention of his controversial measure to all but end collective bargaining for most public workers in Wisconsin.

The political initiative generated vocal opposition and triggered massive protests at the state Capitol and an unsuccessful recall.

Despite Walker’s emphatic claims that the state has rebounded under his political helm, the reality of the situation reveals a far different truth.

Walker has failed miserably in meeting his job creation goal of 250,000 jobs.

Consequently, Wisconsin now finds itself mired in 35th place in the nation, in terms of new job creation.

To make matters worse, Walker’s administration has been under the scrutiny of several John Doe investigations that have targeted his former aides and staffers in Milwaukee County.

Hence, the perception persists that the interests of the Koch Brothers are far more important than the interests of average Wisconsinites.

Scott Walker is held in high esteem in most conservative circles, and there’s even talk of him as a presidential contender in 2016.

But for far too many people in the Badger state, Scott Walker’s initial four years as governor has been a continuing hardship that deserves to end.