Russell Stamper II says potholes must be a priority

Says he is pleased with City of Milwaukee initiative to fill holes, create jobs

Russell Stamper II

Russell Stamper II

Supervisor Russell Stamper II said this week he is pleased that the City of Milwaukee is moving forward with an initiative that will create jobs and fix potholes in our city.

“After a brutal winter, potholes have left streets in the City of Milwaukee crippled and quite hazardous,” Stamper said.

“They are endangering citizens and their vehicles. The repair of city streets must be a priority not only because of the danger but because bad streets affect the perception of the city’s diverse neighborhoods”

Supervisor Stamper asked for the city’s help in offering creative and innovative solutions to address these potholes and deteriorating streets.

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett was joined by other local officials including Milwaukee Common Council president Michael Murphy on Wednesday, April 9 (Speaking at podium) announcing a program aimed at fixing area potholes created by this past year’s winter conditions. (Photos by Robert A. Bell)

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett was joined by other local officials including Milwaukee Common Council president Michael Murphy on Wednesday, April 9 (Speaking at podium) announcing a program aimed at fixing area potholes created by this past year’s winter conditions. (Photo by Robert A. Bell)

He said the city took a bold step in developing a new plan to increase and improve repairs when Mayor Tom Barrett and members of the Common Council unveiled a proposal that calls for the hiring of 25 full-time people who have been in the criminal justice system or have had difficulty finding a job.

“I want to thank the City of Milwaukee for responding to the pothole issue in a fast and effective manner,” Stamper said.

“This program will ensure job creation, job training for the unemployed and underemployed and, at the same time, provide street repair.

Participants of this transitional job will also learn social skills and other soft skills.

The fewer potholes on the street, the fewer repairs we have to do to our cars.

More importantly, the more sustainable employment we can ensure for our residents, the better our community will be.”

The city of Milwaukee will work with a nonprofit agency group United Migrant Opportunity Services, (UMOS), to provide workers with a six-month transitional job repairing pothole-ridden streets.

(Photo by Robert A. Bell)

(Photo by Robert A. Bell)

Additionally, workers have an opportunity to be considered for openings for city jobs or perhaps with private contractors.

UMOS will pay the workers $7.25 an hour, and the city will supplement that wage by $2.26 an hour.

In addition to more than $240,000 channeled through UMOS, the city would appropriate up to $203,700 for wages, drug testing, safety supplies, tools and asphalt and stone for the repair work. The workers are expected to begin in May.

Potholes can be reported through the City’s Call Center at 286-CITY (286-2489).